Federalism and the Federal Government: A policy white paper

Texas is fully capable of addressing its health care, environmental, and educational issues at the state level (an assertion which is fully supported by legislation passed over the past decade, including the General Appropriations Acts).  Indeed, our federalist system of government demands it, and in the case of public education, the Texas Constitution requires it.

In response to decades of increasing centralization of control at the federal level, there are many things that Texas can do to reassert its authority in these areas.

A summary of this paper’s recommendations follows:

Advocate for greater checks on the power and authority of the federal government by:

  1. Declining Medicaid expansion, refusing to set up an “Exchange,” passing health care freedom legislation, and publicly supporting legal challenges against the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act;
  2. Calling on Congress to adopt a balanced budget amendment to the United States Constitution and continuing to call for a Constitutional Convention to the same end;
  3. Passing a resolution calling for an amendment to the United States Constitution providing that no court may impose a tax, or require a state or local government to impose, collect, or raise a tax, and calling for Constitutional Convention to the same end; and
  4. Passing a Resolution calling for an amendment to the United States Constitution prohibiting the federal government from enacting any unfunded mandates and calling for a Constitutional Convention to the same end.

For background and more information, download the full report: Federalism and the Federal Government: A policy white paper on reasserting Texas’ role within the federal system